Students from warm climates adjust to dramatic Midwest weather

By Koumae Adams, Contributing Writer

With students from all over the world, the University is considered one of the most diverse universities in Illinois. Yet for those who aren’t from the Midwest and are used to warmer climates, it can be hard to deal with the chilling seasons.

The Midwest is known for its drastic change of climate at rapid speeds. Familiar to lifetime residents, it can be a shocking switch for students who need to adjust to the new environment.

Everyone handles the outside temperatures differently. Some students like the differing climates, while others have struggled to come to terms with the cold.

Sri Gandikota, freshman in Business, is from San Francisco, Calif. He claimed that despite coming from a sunny state, he feels no mental or physical shift as the Midwest weather drastically cools down.

“I don’t really feel any difference, really the same more or less,” Gandikota said.

Gandikota also claimed that he hasn’t experienced much cold weather, but the Midwest weather has not hit its lowest peak yet.

“The coldest I’ve experienced is the snowy parts of California that doesn’t really compare to here, but I haven’t really experienced that cold of weather,” Gandikota said.

The expectations for the winter weather vary from person to person. Many students expect that the weather will change as the cold season continues. Gandikota said he assumes it will get freezing and windy.

Jackson Gentile, freshman in Engineering, is from Long Beach, Calif. He expressed worries about the snowy future drastically different from the winters in his hometown.

“I’m kind of concerned, I think,” Gentile said. “I think once it starts to snow, once it gets below 32 degrees, that’s when it’s going to hit.”

Like Gentile, students used to heated weather can find it challenging to adapt to a new environment with a drastically polarizing climate and find ways to combat the harsh weather.

“Probably just wearing more long sleeve clothes and being outside a little bit less,” Gentile said. “The worst is when you’re biking or running and then the wind hits your hands.”

Despite his concern, Gentile said he is excited about the frequent snowfall soon to come.

“I definitely look forward to the snow in general, because it is pretty rare to me,” Gentile said. “I think I’ve only seen snow two times ever.”

Rishit Chatterjee, freshman in Engineering, is originally from Dubai. Chatterjee said he had trouble handling the unpredictable chilly weather.

“It’s like I go outside some days knowing that it’s going to be cold,” Chatterjee said. “And sometimes, I over prepare. Sometimes, I don’t. Sometimes it’s too cold for me. Sometimes I dress too cold for the weather. It is how it is.”

However, Chatterjee said there are positives of the frosty temperature like snow and snowball fights.

Students who new to the Midwest can experience trouble coping with the hot and cold weather. Chatterjee said he sometimes has to test new methods to see what works to warm up during this frosty time.

“I tried layering, and I tried hot food and drinks,” Chatterjee said. “I am testing out new ways to combat the cold weather. I’m playing around with what combination works the best for me right now, figuring things out.”

Chatterjee said he is still looking forward to experiencing the chill of the winter season on campus, even with the uncertainty of the conditions.

“When is the snow coming?” Chatterjee asked.

 

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