Clinton salutes Obama, belittles McCain in Denver

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., stands on stage before addressing the Democratic National Convention in Denver on Tuesday. Charlie Neibergall, The Associated Press

AP

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., stands on stage before addressing the Democratic National Convention in Denver on Tuesday. Charlie Neibergall, The Associated Press

By David Espo

DENVER – Hillary Rodham Clinton summoned millions of voters who supported her in the primaries to send Barack Obama to the White House Tuesday night, declaring in a Democratic National Convention speech that the man who defeated her “is my candidate and he must be our president.”

In a prime time address, the former first lady added, “we don’t have a moment to lose or a vote to spare.”

The packed convention floor became a sea of white “Hillary” signs as the New York senator strode to the podium, and thousands of Democrats cheered as she took a pre-speech sip of water.

While her prepared remarks included a full-throated endorsement of Obama, she did not indicate whether she would have her name placed in nomination or seek a formal roll call of the states when the nomination is awarded by delegates on Wednesday night.

Calling herself a “proud supporter of Barack Obama, she dismissed Republican John McCain with a few choice words.

“No way. No how. No McCain,” she said as the hall erupted in cheers.

“We don’t need four more years … of the last eight years,” she added.

Like other failed candidates at conventions past, Clinton recalled her own quest for the White House.

“You taught me so much, you made me laugh and … you even made me cry,” she said to supporters in the Pepsi Center and millions more watching on nationwide television.

“You allowed me to become part of your lives, and you became part of mine.”

“I want you to ask yourselves, ‘Were you in this campaign just for me?'” she asked.

Clinton was the featured speaker of the second night of the convention, and she followed a series of other Democrats to the podium who had ripped into Republican McCain as indifferent to the working class and cozy with big oil.

If he’s the answer, then the question must be ridiculous,” New York Gov. David Paterson said of the GOP presidential candidate.

Said Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland, “It’s time to bring our jobs back and bring our troops home.”

“Call the roll!” urged Ted Sorensen, a party elder eager to propel Obama toward the White House as the first black president.

Not yet.

Obama’s formal nomination