Remaining students move out of temporary housing

Dorm lounges no longer in use as overflow accommodations

Temporary+housing+units+in+ISR+converted+lounges+into+makeshift+dorm+rooms+using+bunk+beds+and+desks.+All+students+living+in+temporary+housing+have+been+relocated+this+semester.

Photos Courtesy of University Housing

Temporary housing units in ISR converted lounges into makeshift dorm rooms using bunk beds and desks. All students living in temporary housing have been relocated this semester.

By Aliza Majid, Staff Writer

University Housing has announced there are no students remaining in the temporary housing areas after an overflow of students last semester.

The study lounges were essentially converted into dorm rooms this fall, said Jessica Skocinski, freshman in LAS. The tables in the study lounges were moved and replaced with four bunk beds. The Ikenberry Commons, ISR and FAR all participated in overflow housing efforts.

Since there was a record-breaking number of freshmen admitted into the University this fall, there was a need for the temporary housing facilities to accommodate incoming students. The University guarantees housing for freshmen, which is why this plan has been implemented. 

Students who were placed into these temporary lodging areas were given 50% off their housing fee during their stay in these areas. 

The University does not have this displacement issue every year, but it plans out the housing situation a year and a half before the start of the school year to make sure all incoming students have a place to stay on campus. The record number of first-year students forced the University to turn to temporary housing. 

“(We were) able to make adjustments to ensure that we were able to put as few residents in temporary housing as we could,” said Chelsea Hamilton, senior director of communications.

As soon as people opt out of attending the University or as other living arrangements arise, students in temporary housing would be allowed to move in.

“This year we had 25 students who were still in temp housing after fall break, and we leave them there because students have shared with us in the past that they don’t like to move toward the end of the finals because there’s been a concern for academics, so we just felt like ‘OK, we’re listening to a resident,’” Hamilton said.

Because the residents living in temporary housing were held there until finals were done, they were not moved into permanent housing until the spring semester. The transitioning period would have caused trouble for students during finals season, which is why it was held off until after break.

Skocisnki said students who have lived in these temporary housing areas may have various experiences, but there are certain differences between this arrangement and a permanent dorming area.

“It didn’t feel too different from dorms,” Skocinski said. “Except now that I’m in a new dorm, I see the things we couldn’t do in the temporary dorm. We couldn’t change our bed arrangements. It was just wherever, whoever got there first got to pick the best bed and desk. It was kind of stressful with three other roommates since we had to be in a quad.” 

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