UI proposes no tuition increase for incoming students

By Daily Illini Staff Report

The University has again recommended maintaining in-state tuition for next year’s freshman class.

In a press release issued Wednesday, the University confirmed that it will propose keeping base tuition for the Urbana campus at $12,036 for Illinois residents at the Board of Trustees meeting Thursday.

Base tuition for the Chicago and Springfield campuses would remain at $10,584 and $9,405 respectively. Out-of-state and international students tuition will increase by 1.7 percent.

According to the release, the decision “reflects the University’s commitment to student access and affordability.”

In a recent interview with The Daily Illini’s editorial board Interim Chancellor Barbara Wilson and President Timothy Killeen expressed UI’s commitment to serving students.

“The financial footprint for higher ed is changing across the country as states invest in other things and divest, especially in public higher ed, the challenge for us to continue to do what we’re doing in great ways but to remain affordable,” Wilson said. “I think the whole financial model of higher ed is changing and we have to be responsive to that. We can’t just keep increasing our tuition and expect to stay a public institution and to stay accessible to students of all backgrounds.”

Aside from the $4 increase on the student transportation fee — approved in November’s student referendum — the University will also recommend the board does not increase student fees. Fees currently cost over $3,000.

The University is the second most expensive Big Ten public school to attend for the 2015-2016 school year.http://blog.collegetuitioncompare.com/2014/04/big-ten-conference-tuition-comparison.html

Last year, enrollment of in-state freshmen increased by 10.2 percent across the University’s three campuses, the release stated.

“I’m very proud of the Urbana campus in their efforts to increase enrollment and recruitment without any sacrifice of excellence,” Killeen said. “Three years in a row of holding a line on tuition. As students, you should be proud of that. I hope you’re proud of that.”

Last year was the first year the University decided to streamline its admissions process to one notification date.

Wilson said the University realized that by deferring “a lot of competent students” at the first notification date it was not yielding them, meaning they ultimately chose other institutions.

“The data suggests that a single date is better for us,” Wilson said. “We get more students accepting our admissions and are excited about coming to Illinois when they don’t get deferred up front and then get admitted later.”

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