The Daily Illini

Thank you, Mom, for everything that you do

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Thank you, Mom, for everything that you do

By Julie Kang, Staff Writer

Dear Mom,

I’ve started a new chapter in my life, and a lot is changing. 

I’m becoming more independent, pushing myself to try new things, making new friends and learning what I am passionate about. I’m doing my own laundry and running to grab a coffee before my next class.

I’m so busy, but I still have time to reflect on life without you by my side. 

You have officially sent me out into the real world. I am no longer a child who has trouble waking up for school and making toast that isn’t burnt. I’m sure that you often worry about me, experiencing new and difficult things, but don’t worry; you’ve taught me well.

I am ashamed to say that college has made me realize that I have often taken you for granted. You are the reason I am here, both at this university and in this world. Through everyday tasks, I have realized that I relied on you so much while I was still at home.

I think of you as I am lugging my heaping pile of dirty clothes to the laundry room and estimating — badly — how much detergent I need to put in the washer, and when I’m eating at the dining hall and wishing I was eating your home-cooked food instead.

You were always there for my ups and downs as I was growing up, but now, a long distance separates us. I really miss walking into your room and venting about my long day, or a disappointing grade on an assignment.

But even though we are apart in distance, I thank you for being there for me and guiding me through my first steps into adulthood. You have worked hard to raise me throughout the years, and I hope to reciprocate the love by making you proud in the future.

I am learning, through your unconditional love, that regret is a horrible feeling. During breaks, while we are together, I fall back to my old self with past habits. When I come back to school, I regret not spending enough time with you and not telling you how I really feel. I know I can’t take it all back, so I am working to make sure I eventually can live life without regrets.

You teach me so much; more than you will ever know.  You’ve taught me what true friendships look like, through ours. I often hope for that connection when making friends in college and continue to search for it when I meet new people.

But then I remember that our connection is one-of-a-kind. You’ve showed me what true love is through your words and actions, and taught me that good experiences and memories are more valuable than any material possession.

Mothers, like yourself, should be celebrated and shown appreciation daily, because your importance is endless. But I guess a Moms Weekend will do. Thank you — for your patience, grace, caring heart and love.

Love,

Your daughter

Julie is a freshman in Media.

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