Album Review: The Sun Days' debut record, 'Album,' a breath of fresh air

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By Jake Valentine

Swedish indie-pop group The Sun Days just re-released its debut record, ironically titled “Album.”AG This record was first released last summer, but after gaining popularity, Boston independent record label Run For Cover Records picked up the LP and re-released it in an effort to bring the Swedish outfit to AmericaAG. “Album” has been available since March 25.AG

“Album” is a breath of fresh air. In a time where indie-pop groups have seemingly grown stale with ‘80s-inspired instrumentals and electric vocal effects, hearing a band execute such a simple yet beautiful sound is refreshing. With incredibly catchy guitar riffs and licks paired with the sharp yet smooth vocals of lead singer Elsa Holmgren,AG not bopping your head to almost every song off this record proves challenging.

The Sun Days aren’t reinventing the wheel with “Album,” but the record as a whole is still original and invigorating. Finding a dull or boring place while listening to “Album” is hard, as all tracks are upbeat and captivating from the start. The record seamlessly flows from one track to another in a steady and fluid manner.

What sets “Album” apart from almost every other indie-pop record released in the last two years is the combination of Holmgren’s crisp vocals and the infectious shoegazey guitar tones that are present in every song. The landscape created throughout each track can become a bit repetitive after a few listens, but luckily “Album” is a meager eight songs AGspanning just around the half-hour mark.AG

The first track and lead single “Don’t Need to Be Them” hooks in listeners right away with a tambourine-infused drumbeat in the verse before exploding into the powerful vocals of Holmgren in the chorus. “Don’t Need to Be Them”AG is definitely the most memorable track off this record, as the rest of the album struggles to grasp a chorus as catchy and melodic.

Songs like “I Keep On Wondering” and “You Can’t Make Me Make Up My Mind”AG are seemingly perfect tracks for sunny days and summer car rides spent with the windows down. Both songs chug along effortlessly due to their rhythmic bass lines, and their pop-inspired guitars jangle along within the backdrop.

All in all, “Album” is an impressive debut for the Swedish pop rockers. The Sun Days have crafted a record that flows perfectly from start to finish and never shallows or feels sluggish. “Album” is a fun record — a collection of pure, unadulterated indie-pop songs that are perfect for days spent on the beach.

Rating:8.5/10?

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