Hogan comments on proposed university changes

University President Michael Hogan met with the Urbana-Champaign Senate on Monday to answer questions about possible administrative changes and amendments to the University statues that he proposed to the Board of Trustees at its meeting Sept. 23.

Joyce Tolliver, chair of the Senate Executive Committee, said these were the first formal proposals to restructure senate statues, and they could greatly affect the campus today and for generations to come.

Part of the plan put forth by the board was to elimUniversity President Michael Hogan met with the Urbana-Champaign Senate on Monday to answer questions about possible administrative changes and amendments to the University statues that he proposed to the Board of Trustees at its meeting Sept. 23.

Joyce Tolliver, chair of the Senate Executive Committee, said these were the first formal proposals to restructure senate statues, and they could greatly affect the campus today and for generations to come.

Part of the plan put forth by the board was to eliminate some of the redundancies and share some of the services, such as human resources, and to implement a Vice President of Research for all three campuses in the University’s system—Chicago, Urbana and Springfield.

Hogan said the board looked to the statues to reform the University after last year’s admissions scandal and the ongoing budget crisis. The goal was to reestablish the vision of the University system to lead to a better and cheaper university, Hogan said.

“It was a reflection of the leadership crisis that was going on for awhile,” he added.

The meeting highlighted the concerns of the faculty, staff and students about the proposed changes to the statues and how that would affect the identity of the Urbana-Champaign campus as being a separate institution with its own individualized goals.

Faculty members expressed concerns over giving individual chancellors authority over matters on all three campuses, as would be the case if the title “Vice President” was given to chancellors from Urbana, Springfield and Chicago.

“The system is taking away our autonomy from each of the campuses and takes away our vitality,” said history professor Mark Steinberg.

Senate Executive Committee member and Illinois Student Senate President David Olsen, senior in Business, said he was concerned about the value of a degree from Urbana-Champaign diminishing because of a perceived notion that these plans will lead to a one university system.

“A degree in finance is different from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign than from UIC,” Olsen said.

Hogan said the statues explained that each university has a different mission and that nothing changes the statues of this campus. He said the board has been coming up with these plans before he was appointed president.

The plan to add a vice president of Health Affairs to the University administration could increase research funds on all three campuses, Hogan said.

Retired Professor of Computer Science George Friedman said he gained a better understanding of where Hogan is coming from with these changes.

“I’m impressed by insertion that it’s more the board’s proposal than his and that this has been planned before his arrival on campus,” Friedman said.inate some of the redundancies and share some of the services, such as human resources, and to implement a Vice President of Research for all three campuses in the University’s system—Chicago, Urbana and Springfield.

Hogan said the board looked to the statues to reform the University after last year’s admissions scandal and the ongoing budget crisis. The goal was to reestablish the vision of the University system to lead to a better and cheaper university, Hogan said.

“It was a reflection of the leadership crisis that was going on for awhile,” he added.

The meeting highlighted the concerns of the faculty, staff and students about the proposed changes to the statues and how that would affect the identity of the Urbana-Champaign campus as being a separate institution with its own individualized goals.

Faculty members expressed concerns over giving individual chancellors authority over matters on all three campuses, as would be the case if the title “Vice President” was given to chancellors from Urbana, Springfield and Chicago.

“The system is taking away our autonomy from each of the campuses and takes away our vitality,” said history professor Mark Steinberg.

Senate Executive Committee member and Illinois Student Senate President David Olsen, senior in Business, said he was concerned about the value of a degree from Urbana-Champaign diminishing because of a perceived notion that these plans will lead to a one university system.

“A degree in finance is different from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign than from UIC,” Olsen said.

Hogan said the statues explained that each university has a different mission and that nothing changes the statues of this campus. He said the board has been coming up with these plans before he was appointed president.

The plan to add a vice president of Health Affairs to the University administration could increase research funds on all three campuses, Hogan said.

Retired Professor of Computer Science George Friedman said he gained a better understanding of where Hogan is coming from with these changes.

“I’m impressed by insertion that it’s more the board’s proposal than his and that this has been planned before his arrival on campus,” Friedman said.