Graduates concerned with finding a job

University of Illinois President B. Joseph White shakes the hand of a doctoral graduate at the U of I Commencement ceremony at Assembly Hall on Sunday afternoon, May 13, 2007. Erica Magda

University of Illinois President B. Joseph White shakes the hand of a doctoral graduate at the U of I Commencement ceremony at Assembly Hall on Sunday afternoon, May 13, 2007. Erica Magda

By Alissa Groeninger

With graduation around the corner, many students are facing the reality of hunting for jobs.

“I just got really frustrated because it was really hard,” said Sophie Malik, senior in International Studies and Spanish.

Malik said she went to job fairs and searched online for available positions. After little success, she finally found a good situation with a company in London that she interned with during college. She will soon be working as a project manager for a translating agency.

Recently graduated students often find luck starting with internships that have the promise of a job.

Adam Biernacki, senior in political science, secured an internship with the Chicago Fire, a professional soccer team. His internship is in player development and he expects it to lead to a job.

However, Biernacki said his friends in engineering and business have had more luck than anyone else in terms of being hired.

Anil Bera, professor of economics, agrees with this, saying that an engineering graduate from the University is almost gauranteed to find a job.

He added that your ability to find a job depends heavily on your major.

Malik said it is harder for liberal arts and science majors to find jobs.

“There’s a lot of issues that affect finding the right job, or a job,” she said.

Malik wanted to find something that she knew she would truly enjoy, which made the search more difficult.

A lot of people are taking entry level positions, like jobs as an assistant, she added.

Although finding a job may be difficult, Bera said the job market is improving.

“I know people are getting jobs this year,” he said.

He added that all of his PHD students have jobs and most of his undergraduate students have found work as well.

Bera attributes the improved job market to a growing belief that the economy is expected to improve within the next few years. Many people feel that the economy will start rising once a new president is in office, he said.

“People believe something will be different next year,” Bera added.

In the meantime, there are many things seniors can do to make finding a job easier. Malik recommends taking computer courses and studying abroad.

“That really helps exponentially,” she said.

Biernacki recommends using the career center to start your search. Kristina Perez, senior in Media, said she has yet to find a job but is sending her resume to everyone she can.

No matter what their major was, Malik said University graduates often find success because employers respect the institution.

“It would be a lot harder (to find a job) if we didn’t go to U of I,” Malik said. “People know it’s a good school all over the place.”