Focusing on shirt campaign’s successes

By Marc Kovarsky

Despite being insulted at Katie Dunne’s comments made against this organization’s attempt to raise money and awareness for this prevalent and extremely meaningful cause, I will do my best to not further offend those who didn’t understand the intentions behind the shirt.

As an advertising major, I found this concept intriguing – the ethical dilemma on where to draw the line between humor and cancer. One of the major goals in any campaign is to draw people’s attention by creating something that stands out. This shirt clearly does. Likewise, one major goals of CAC is to raise awareness about cancer in general. When people initially see the shirt, at first they may think it is some idiotic, antifeminist attempt to proclaim their sexual orientation, however I think it leads to much more than that.

When talking to Breast Cancer Survivors and those currently battling this vicious disease, they believed the shirts “bring humor and laughter” to the situation. These people used those defense mechanisms to get through their battles.

Let me clarify, trivializing a disease solely to make money is wrong. However, if this shirt gets one or even ten people to go get a mammogram or read a related article about prevention methods, then the campaign, in my opinion, was a success.

Therefore, before I steal all your dignity, I want to apologize to those who were offended by the shirts. Instead of focusing on the politics and methods used towards this constant pursuit in finding a cure for Breast Cancer, lets focus on its successes. CAC raised a lot of money for the American Cancer Society while advocating awareness for all. It may not be the most traditional technique, but judging by the numbers of shirts sold, they must have done something right.