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Dish of the Week: Colorful edamame salad

Colorful+edamame+salad%2C+a+recipe+from+the+University+of+Illinois+Wellness+Center%E2%80%99s+Recipe+Box%2C+is+a+healthy+dish+to+try+during+March%2C+which+is+Nutrition+and+Dietetics%E2%80%99+National+Nutrition+Month.
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Dish of the Week: Colorful edamame salad

Colorful edamame salad, a recipe from the University of Illinois Wellness Center’s Recipe Box, is a healthy dish to try during March, which is Nutrition and Dietetics’ National Nutrition Month.

Colorful edamame salad, a recipe from the University of Illinois Wellness Center’s Recipe Box, is a healthy dish to try during March, which is Nutrition and Dietetics’ National Nutrition Month.

Colorful edamame salad, a recipe from the University of Illinois Wellness Center’s Recipe Box, is a healthy dish to try during March, which is Nutrition and Dietetics’ National Nutrition Month.

Colorful edamame salad, a recipe from the University of Illinois Wellness Center’s Recipe Box, is a healthy dish to try during March, which is Nutrition and Dietetics’ National Nutrition Month.

By Stephanie Kim

With shredded carrots, spinach leaves, cherry tomatoes and more, this colorful edamame salad will give you a fresh start to Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ National Nutrition Month.  

It may even revive short-lived New Year’s resolutions related to healthy eating. Whatever the case may be, one thing is for sure: you will achieve the campaign’s theme for March: “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.” 

I found this recipe from the University of Illinois Wellness Center’s Recipe Box, a website that compiles healthy recipes submitted by students and community members. 

Of the options listed under the category “Salads,” the “Colorful Edamame Salad” caught my eye. 

According to eatright.org, a website sponsored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, edamame is the only food with plant protein of the same protein quality found in meat and eggs. These small green soybeans are also a good source of vitamins, minerals, potassium and fiber. Plus, they are just as fun to eat as they are to say. Edamame resemble lima beans without the dreaded pasty aftertaste. Its subtle butter flavor, smooth texture and soft crunch make it the star of any salad.  

Ingredients:

4 cups spinach leaves and lettuce (original listed Romaine lettuce)

1 cup shredded carrots

2 cups cherry tomatoes

1 cup sliced cucumber

1/2 cup chopped red onion 

1 1/2 cups cooked shelled edamame

Directions:

1. Rinse the vegetables and chop if need be. 

2. Boil three cups of water and cook the edamame for four minutes. Rinse under cold running water and peel shells to remove the cooked beans.

3. Toss and mix fresh vegetables.

4. Add salad dressing if desired. For fewer calories and a more natural taste, try adding a handful of seeds and dried fruit instead.

Stephanie is a senior in Media. She can be reached at [email protected]

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