Editorial | Better tomorrow depends upon student newsrooms

The+Daily+Illini+Opinions+Editor+Nathaniel+Langley+makes+edits+on+the+Graduation+Guide+on+Saturday.+%22In+presenting+one%E2%80%99s+voice%2C+the+world+is+exposed+to+fresh+concepts+administered+by+its+succeeding+generation%2C%22+Langley+writes.

Cameron Krasucki

The Daily Illini Opinions Editor Nathaniel Langley makes edits on the Graduation Guide on Saturday. “In presenting one’s voice, the world is exposed to fresh concepts administered by its succeeding generation,” Langley writes.

By Nathaniel Langley, Opinions Editor

Our student newsrooms require unbridled attention and assistance. As the local source for news, culture, opinions and sports, student newspapers are the adjacent avenues for information across universities and college towns already crowded with details. This fact especially applies to The Daily Illini: The University’s newspaper serving as the free-spirited voice for the student body for 150 years. 

Particularly considering my experience working with the opinions section, writing for the DI has fostered innumerable benefits both for my writing and future.

Additionally, with “Perspectives” recent addition to this section, the opportunity has never been greater to contribute your voice to the continual chorus of opinions and outlooks. Therein, the DI is more than an informative publication, it also serves as a platform for which the undisclosed or unexpressed is produced for an eager audience.

No better joy arrives than in having the outlet publish opinions both locally centered and fixated abroad. Whether it be, through my individual columns — disavowing the Senate filibuster, asserting that Dogecoin is a pyramid scheme or equating the war in Iraq with Vietnam — freely communicating one’s beliefs is profoundly liberating.

Similarly, the possibilities for craftable opinions are limitless. Ranging from whether or not one craves rightly addressing University mistakes, or conveying their admiration for Taylor Swift, opinions will be there for students with a spectacular column.

Relating, as well, to “Perspectives,” one now possess the chance to creatively demonstrate positions a column previously could not suffice. Furthermore, there is a therapeutic nature both with designing personal general pieces.

Thanks to the DI, my perspective of being raised by a single mother escapes the canals of my mind and discovers refuge in the public sphere.

The Daily Illini Opinions Editor Nathaniel Langley makes edits on the Graduation Guide on Saturday. (Cameron Krasucki)

In general, this exchange between private knowledge and public comprehension is pivotal. In presenting one’s voice, the world is exposed to fresh concepts administered by its succeeding generation.

The youth will sway society. Already this generation has proven itself worthy of valiant social progress and political accountability, yet opportunity remains: The DI is the location for this continual endeavor. Already this reaction has begun: A conversation fostering between those delivering and receiving opinions.

Following the publication of my Dogecoin column, I was labeled numerous titles. Whether it be “price manipulator,” “narcissist” or a classic “fool,” the Dogecoin certainly was not thrilled. Yet, the piece itself stands as a pillar to the opinions section: Dispatch your view and unveil an audience to your authoritative posture. 

Columnists must hold no resistance in their efforts to transmit their impassioned, informative viewpoints. It is the responsibility of this student opinions section to reveal to audiences formerly unheard or withheld thinkings.

However, our student newsrooms need your help. Divulging profound thoughts is not an uncomplicated process nor fabrication. As such, for student journalism to succeed, it will require an “all hands on deck” strategy. 

With #SaveStudentNewsrooms, consider supporting our venture for not only disclosing the crucial truth for the student body but as well as contributing to a newsroom dedicated to refined minds for a better tomorrow. Thank you.

Nathaniel is a sophomore in LAS.

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